however

[[t]haʊe̱və(r)[/t]]
1) ADV: ADV with cl You use however when you are adding a comment which is surprising or which contrasts with what has just been said.

This was not an easy decision. It is, however, a decision that we feel is dictated by our duty...

Some of the food crops failed. However, the cotton did quite well...

Higher sales have not helped profits, however.

Syn:
2) ADV: ADV adj/adv, ADV many/much (emphasis) You use however before an adjective or adverb to emphasize that the degree or extent of something cannot change a situation.

You should always strive to achieve more, however well you have done before...

However hard she tried, nothing seemed to work...

There is no sunset however beautiful, no joke however funny, no movie, no meal that I can enjoy only by myself...

However much it hurt, he could do it.

Syn:
no matter how
3) CONJ-SUBORD You use however when you want to say that it makes no difference how something is done.

However we adopt healthcare reform, it isn't going to save major amounts of money...

Wear your hair however you want.

4) ADV: ADV many/much, ADV adv You use however in expressions such as or however long it takes and or however many there were to indicate that the figure you have just mentioned may not be accurate.

The 20,000 or however many who come to watch would love to be out on the pitch...

Wait 30 to 60 minutes or however long it takes.

5) QUEST (emphasis) You can use however to ask in an emphatic way how something has happened which you are very surprised about. Some speakers of English think that this form is incorrect and prefer to use `how ever'.

However did you find this place in such weather?

Syn:

English dictionary. 2008.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • however — 1. When ever is being used as an intensive after the interrogative adverb how, as in How ever did you do it?, the two words should always be written separately. 2. However, in the meaning ‘nevertheless’, has many possible positions in a clause.… …   Modern English usage

  • However — How*ev er, conj. Nevertheless; notwithstanding; yet; still; though; as, I shall not oppose your design; I can not, however, approve of it. [1913 Webster] In your excuse your love does little say; You might howe er have took a better way. Dryden.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • However — How*ev er, adv. [Sometimes contracted into howe er.] 1. In whetever manner, way, or degree. [1913 Webster] However yet they me despise and spite. Spenser. [1913 Webster] Howe er the business goes, you have made fault. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. At… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • however — [hou eer′hou ev′ər] adv. [ME hou ever] 1. no matter how; in whatever manner 2. to whatever degree or extent 3. by what means [however did he escape?]: intensive form of HOW1 4. nevertheless; yet; in spite of that; all the same: often used as a… …   English World dictionary

  • however — index notwithstanding, regardless, unless Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • however — late 14c., from HOW (Cf. how) + EVER (Cf. ever) …   Etymology dictionary

  • however — [adv] still, nevertheless after all, all the same, anyhow, be that as it may, but, despite, for all that, howbeit, in spite of, nonetheless, notwithstanding, on the other hand, per contra, though, withal, without regard to, yet; concept 544 …   New thesaurus

  • however — ► ADVERB 1) used to introduce a statement contrasting with a previous one. 2) in whatever way. 3) to whatever extent …   English terms dictionary

  • however — how|ev|er [ hau evər ] function word *** However can be used in the following ways: as a way of showing how a sentence is related to what has already been said: Prices have been rising. It is unlikely, however, that this increase will continue.… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • however */*/*/ — UK [haʊˈevə(r)] / US [haʊˈevər] adverb, conjunction Summary: However can be used in the following ways: as a way of showing how a sentence is related to what has already been said: Prices have been rising. It is unlikely, however, that this… …   English dictionary

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